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gabrielgastelum:

Happy Friday folks. I had the opportunity to photograph @chrissalvatore and his new line of underwear. Check out the blog post. Link in my profile #fashion #undies

gabrielgastelum:

Happy Friday folks. I had the opportunity to photograph @chrissalvatore and his new line of underwear. Check out the blog post. Link in my profile #fashion #undies

07:41 pm, BY librariansoul[34 notes]

08:55 am, BY librariansoul[6 notes]

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Anonymous asked: What advice do you have for aspiring librarian high school students? How to proceed with the rest of my high school years to ensure future librarianism? Also, from a gay to a gay (lesbian) are you out at work? If so, what is it like? Thank you greatly.

The first observation I’ll make is that I didn’t know I wanted to be a librarian until I was almost done with a master’s degree in math, so keep your options open. If you’re like most people, you’ll change your mind at least twice during college, if not more often.

On a more encouraging note, however, the educational path to become a librarian is very forgiving, so you have time to change your mind and then change it back. In high school and as an undergraduate, focus on learning how to learn, learning how to use databases and information sources, and—if you get the chance—on explaining concepts to other people. What you study doesn’t really matter, although I suggest majoring in something that interests you. (I understand that library schools get a lot of applicants who majored in English as undergraduates. If you major in a less common discipline that can boost your chances of being accepted—graduate programs tend to like diversity, at least to a degree.)

The single most important thing you can do right now to make library career more realistic is: get some library experience. Whether that means volunteering at your local public library or getting student job as a shelver at your college library, get experience under your belt. Put yourself forward, ask questions, go above and beyond, impress your supervisor, and try to get into a position where you serve the public. Because that’s what being a librarian means: serving the public.

What may happen is that you’ll discover you hate it. In which case you’ll know that a career as a librarian is probably not for you, and you won’t waste your time pursuing it.

On the other hand, if you do enjoy it, you’ll have something tangible to put on your resume. Past library experience is the single most important element I look for when I’m hiring. (Not the only important factor, and the library world isn’t the only place you can acquire the skills a successful candidate has learned, but still: the single most important element.) So get some experience if you can.

In short: don’t worry about any specific educational path until it’s time to go to library school. Learn how to learn, and get library experience. And allow yourself to change your mind if it comes to that.

As for being out: yes, I’m completely out at work. My coworkers generally seem accepting, although straight people—even straight ‘allies’—can still be clueless and homophobic on occasion, but so far I’ve never had to make a formal complaint against anyone.

The only open homophobia I’ve encountered as a librarian has been from the public—mostly from shitty people who are angry at me for enforcing library policy. Those experiences are awful, but I do have the mild satisfaction of kicking the offending person out of the library for using degrading and abusive speech. So there’s that.

Anyway, good luck. Keep in mind that I’m just one librarian, with his own opinions. Don’t take this as gospel.

08:53 am, BY librariansoul[8 notes]

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misandry-mermaid:

fozmeadows:

nothingman:

via http://www.listen-tome.com/save-me/

IT’S 2AM AND I’M LAUGHING WAY TOO LOUD HELP

WHOEVER MADE THIS PLEASE ACCEPT MY HAND IN MARRIAGE

misandry-mermaid:

fozmeadows:

nothingman:

via http://www.listen-tome.com/save-me/

IT’S 2AM AND I’M LAUGHING WAY TOO LOUD HELP

WHOEVER MADE THIS PLEASE ACCEPT MY HAND IN MARRIAGE

(via note-a-bear)

07:47 pm, BY librariansoul[24,854 notes]

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(Source: meanwhiledaniel, via ooohhnooo)

10:43 am, BY librariansoul[8,066 notes]

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theuppitynegras:

blackberryshawty:

orawrsco:

Why did no one tell me about this?! MS. FINE AND MR. SHEFFIELD 4 LYFE


He still foine too. Hey, daddy.

do he need a nanny for his grandkids cuz I am available

theuppitynegras:

blackberryshawty:

orawrsco:

Why did no one tell me about this?! MS. FINE AND MR. SHEFFIELD 4 LYFE

He still foine too. Hey, daddy.

do he need a nanny for his grandkids cuz I am available

10:40 am, BY librariansoul[4,543 notes]

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ourvaluedcustomers:

After his friend told him that “the movie sucks ‘cuz it’s not the same as the book”…

ourvaluedcustomers:

After his friend told him that “the movie sucks ‘cuz it’s not the same as the book”…

10:40 am, BY librariansoul[840 notes]

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tanjensen asked: I follow you on my non-mostly porn Tumblr, and have enjoyed most of your posts. My question is related to the field of library science. I work in a public library in the Midwest, and been flirting with the idea of attending an MLIS/MLS program with the ambition of working in an academic library. Would you recommend earning an MLIS/MLS and following into this field? I know that it is constantly changing, but am worried about the influx in MLIS/MLS students into the workplace, or is it hype?

This is always a difficult question—and I don’t really have a good answer for you. Here are some things to keep in mind, though.

Getting an MLS is not difficult. As far as master’s programs go, it’s … well, I thought it was really easy. Almost insultingly so.

Which is related to my next point: The average MLS program doesn’t teach you any special skills or knowledge you won’t learn on the job. And it won’t teach you a great deal of necessary things that you’ll actually need on the job. (My program was extremely light on customer-service-type training, for instance, beyond the usual ‘reference interview’ stuff.)

For many people, getting a job as a librarian once they’re done with the MLS program is the hard part. The recession hit libraries as well as the rest of the economy—I see MLS grads applying for jobs as library assistants and even shelvers at my library and being grateful they could get a job at all.

On the other hand, you won’t become a librarian without an MLS. Most likely, at least. It used to be that, in some places, you might be promoted to librarian after fifteen years of library employment (give or take), but now there are so many online MLS programs and so many MLS holders that libraries are much more comfortable enforcing their MLS requirement.

Academic libraries represent a special challenge. Public library experience counts for a great deal—if you’re applying for work in a public library. It does not seem to count for much in academic libraries. So try to get academic library experience however you can. Be prepared to start at the bottom and work your way up. Many of the better academic libraries require a second master’s degree in a subject discipline, so keep that in mind as well (although as more libraries move away from subject librarians to an ‘information commons’ model, this may become less important).

In short: there are a lot of variables. First decide what you really want, and what you can afford. Then you can decide if it’s worth the gamble.

Good luck!

[Any other librarians or any actual academic librarians can feel free to chime in.]

10:22 am, BY librariansoul[11 notes]

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idiotsonfb:

nerd humor.

(via the-real-goddamazon)

08:13 am, BY librariansoul[83,295 notes]

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(Source: rihannasblunt, via theuppitynegras)

04:52 pm, BY librariansoul[110,396 notes]